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Pain medicine trainee resources

I’ve put together the following documents to help trainees in pain medicine improve their clinical skills, reflect on their own practice and develop evaluative judgement. Observing another doctor seeing a new patient Observing another doctor seeing a review patient Listening skills Empathy part 1 (podcast) Empathy part 2 (podcast) Empathy part 3 (podcast) History taking […]

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Featured

The recruitment process – Getting your resume and cover letter in order

Your resume and cover letter get you an interview. Your resume basically tells your potential employer why they should hire you. Your CV tells them why you’ve chosen them. Make sure that the resume: a) does not have any spelling or grammatical errors (this shows attention to detail) b) is succinct and to-the-point (people don’t […]

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Impact of an Opioid Safety Initiative on Patients Undergoing Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Time Series Analysis.

If there were any doubt about the importance of a comprehensive opioid stewardship program, this study dispels it. The program, outlined in reference 1 has 18 recommendations and I agree wholly with them. Specifically, they recommended AGAINST prescribing long-acting opioids for acute pain, which is consistent with the ANZCA/FPM guidelines. Proportions of patients with chronic […]

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Flipped classroom – Opioid tapering

Please have a listen to this podcast on opioid tapering. It’s recorded by NPR in a conversation with Dr Travis Rieder, a “philosopher by training” and a “bioethicist profession” at Johns Hopkins. He speaks from an informed position of both chronic pain and addiction. The transcript of the podcast is available here. As you’re listening to […]

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Feedback – Do you have to be aware that you’ve contributed to someone’s death to change your practice?

So I stumbled across this article as I was clearing out my email. It interests me for a number of reasons: It highlights the importance of audit and feedback in our ongoing learning as clinicians It shows that with a little bit of feedback, we can change our ways. The intervention was simply a letter […]

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Flipped classroom – Substance use disorders

https://iview.abc.net.au/show/you-can-t-ask-that/series/4/video/LE1817H006S00 Questions to consider: Did you learn anything about substance use disorders when watching the video? If so, what did you learn? Do you think there are common themes between alcohol and opioid use disorders? If so, what do you think the two disorders have in common? Did you learn anything that you could potentially […]

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On the problem with HR

I felt this article in the Atlantic was worthy of a blog post. I picked up on it from the twitter feed of one of my favourite speakers, Adam Grant. (You should listen to his Work Life podcast by TED.com if you haven’t already, and as an aside, I first heard Adam when listening to […]

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Lyrica (pregabalin), linked to addiction and suicide

https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/this-popular-drug-is-linked-to-addiction-and-suicide-why-do-doctors-keep-prescribing-it-20181129-p50j1x.html This has got into the popular press, and I’m glad it has. Pharmacotherapy, in my opinion, is used far too commonly in modern medicine where a quick consultation and a prescription are rewarded over a good consultation and no prescription. I myself was so surprised when I saw this BBC documentary. Add link What […]

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1. Illusion of explanatory depth – we overestimate what we really know. Rebecca Lawson. Our brains are not designed to be knowledge banks Our brains were designed for action and reasoning. Diagnostic reasoning = ability to recognise what happened yesterday causing today. Reasoning from effect to cause is harder than cause to effect. Stories help […]

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